Posted by on May 20, 2020 in Integrated Marketing, Marketing Channels, Marketing Tips, Uncategorized | 0 comments

Getting Started with Google Ads

Getting Started with Google Ads from Brandwidth Solutions

by Scott Fuhr

Among the many opportunities to create exposure for your B2B company – from pre-event promotions and post-event offers to email marketing – is Google Ads. This marketing tool is becoming increasingly popular.

Many companies find managing and placing Google Ads to be confusing. They’re not alone. And make no mistake, since Google is the most popular search engine and most visited website in the world, Google Ads in many cases are a must-have whether we like it or not.

Google recently renamed “AdWords” to “Google Ads.” The ads consist of two types – search and display. Search ads appear above the organic search results on the search engine results page and display ads appear on websites that Google tries to determine are relevant to your audience.

In this post, we’ll focus on how you can get started with the search-type ads. This is where most organizations begin.

Here’s an example of what a paid Google search ad looks like after typing in “office chair” into the search box on Google.com:

Getting Started with Google Ads from Brandwidth Solutions

As you can see, the ad has a bolded “Ad” term in the first line. The search result just beneath it – for Amazon – is organic and is not a paid ad. A good overview of paid Google Ads versus organic search results can be found here.

Square One

To get started with your own campaigns, just sign-up for a Google Ads account.

Again, if you’re just starting out, try search-type ads first. With so much of campaign success riding on the keywords that are used to determine when to display your ads, you may be able to glean some insights from search ads before moving on to the more labor-intensive display ads.

Keyword Research

Speaking of keywords – what are those? Keywords are what users enter into the search box on google.com to search for a topic. Think about what you type in so you can find something. For instance, to find multiple resources for one of my links in the second paragraph of this post, I typed in “top search engine in the world” and got pages full of resourceful links returned to me.

One might find selecting keywords to be daunting, and rightly so. However, to help you decide which keywords to use for your campaign, you can use Google’s own keyword planner. You can enter a product or service or an existing website as examples, and the planner will provide recommendations of keywords to use. Here’s what Google’s keyword planner looks like:

Getting Started with Google Ads from Brandwidth Solutions

Tip: You can also use SEO (search engine optimization) keyword tools from other sources to research keywords that are popular with visitors and that are being used by your competitors. One example is SpyFu, which has a free option.

Write the Ad

As you can probably tell by now, Google Ads are as much about research as they are about writing the ads themselves. Which is what you’ll be doing next.

With tools like SpyFu, you can see examples of other companies’ search ads in some cases. This helps you when deciding what words and headlines to use when writing your own ads. If you don’t want to use an extra tool like SpyFu, just use your best educated assumptions to start out and you can tweak the copy later.

Here’s an example of an ad appearing when searching for “office laptops” on Google:

Getting Started with Google Ads from Brandwith Solutions

The ad – in this case for Dell – showed up within the top three results on the search engine results page. This is likely due to solid ad copy and a good bidding strategy.

Time to Budget

After the ad is written, bidding and budgeting are the other elements needed when implementing Google search ads.

For the budget, select how much you’d like to spend each day and for how long. For example, a good starting point might be $25-$50 per day for 30 days. Check in with your account often. Following the first 30-day period, you may want to evaluate your campaign performance to decide whether to continue. Most often, you’ll want to continue, and you can adjust your budget up or down and also implement the campaign recommendations that Google will likely offer you at this point.

Time to Bid

Google Ads are based on a CPC – or cost-per-click – model. This means you only pay when someone clicks on your ad.

You can start your bidding by selecting a bid strategy that is based upon your campaign objectives. Your goals might be to garner impressions or to simply get web visitors. While bidding consists of some mix of trial and error, analysis, and constant adjustment, a good place to start is with the “maximize clicks” strategy. Google will help you constantly adjust to the best maximum bid automatically by leveraging its growing artificial intelligence engine.

You can learn more about bidding here.

The Power of Google

There are other search engines on which you can place ads – like Bing and Yahoo (Microsoft Advertising) – and perhaps you can do those if your budget allows. However, with a more conservative budget in mind, it’s hard to match Google’s power within the website-user sphere. The term itself has become a verb in many instances – “just try Googling it to see what you can find.”

Brandwidth Solutions serves the healthcare, life sciences, energy, and contract pharma industries. We work with companies that want to make the most of their marketing – who want their marketing empowered to help drive leads – and ultimately sales. If you want to move your product or service forward in a smart way, we want to work with you. Call us at 215.997.8575.

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Posted by on May 1, 2020 in Integrated Marketing, Marketing Channels, Marketing Tips, Uncategorized | 0 comments

When to Use a Case Study in Your Marketing

Brandwidth Solutions: When to Use a Case Study in Your Marketing

by Deb Harrsch

Have you ever met anyone who said case studies don’t work? I sure haven’t.

Using case studies in your marketing is a no-brainer. In fact, we previously explored how important case studies are and how they work.

But, the question is: When should you use them in your marketing?

If you’re creating case studies, publishing them on your website, and then calling it a day, then you’re not getting maximum value from your work.

A Quick Case Study Refresh

Case studies are deceptively simple, and they get right to the point. They enable you to do a bit of storytelling (which is a great marketing tool) and focus on a specific challenge, solution, and result. They are also fairly short – typically around 1,000 words.

The biggest challenge for the marketing department when creating case studies is being able to name the customer. Every B2B industry experiences this issue, so if you’re thinking, “Well, I can’t do any case studies because I’m not allowed to talk about my customers,” you’d be wrong.

It’s okay if you can’t name your client. It’s okay to create a case study with a story and not a name. If your company isn’t allowed to talk about a customer project in detail, think about what you can say. It’s possible there is enough of a story to tell about a challenge and solution, even if you eliminate all of the identifying features.

There are several creative ways you can protect your client’s confidentiality, while also demonstrating your accomplishments. If you can name the who, great! If you can’t name the customer, well that’s okay, too.

What Prospects Want to Know

Case studies are an opportunity for you to show customers that you know who they are, what some of their challenges are, and how you help solve those challenges.

How? Think about it from their perspective.

Your prospect really wants to understand your product or service and how you work with customers. A case study gives them a perfect example from beginning to end: “Here is where we started, this was our solution, and here are the results our customer experienced.” Whether you cut time out of a process, you did it better than they were able to previously, or you were able to deliver some other benefit, you’ve now got results no one else could get. Case studies are great stories that demonstrate how efficient and innovative you are when you’re working with your customers.

When to Use Case Studies

Right, so you’ve created your case study and you’ve published it on your website. Now what? I’ve already told you that isn’t the only way to use them – but it is a valuable use.

What do you think are the most downloaded items on your website – white papers or case studies?

It’s actually the case studies. You see, they aren’t something your prospect needs to register for, so that’s what they’ll download when researching your company. The case study gives them key information and gets them thinking, “Gee, this company has tackled problems similar to what I’m experiencing and they’ve come up with elegant solutions and had great results. I should talk with them.”

But, to truly get full value from your case studies, you’ll also want to use them for your:

  • Email marketing campaigns
  • Print collateral at trade shows
  • Social media content
  • White paper supporting evidence
  • Video stories

Curious about case studies we’ve done for clients and how we’ve used them? Give us a call and let’s talk!

Brandwidth Solutions serves the healthcare, life sciences, energy, and contract pharma industries. We work with companies that want to make the most of their marketing – who want their marketing empowered to help drive leads – and ultimately sales. If you want to move your product or service forward in a smart way, we want to work with you. Call us at 215.997.8575.

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