Posted by on Oct 22, 2018 in Integrated Marketing, Marketing Channels, Marketing Tips, Uncategorized | 0 comments

Science & Social Media: Does it Work?

Wheels create power and movement – and you definitely want to have movement in your marketing! So far, in recent blog posts we’ve talked about all of the sections of the Brandwidth Solutions marketing wheel except for one – social media.

Sometimes I hear, “Well, scientists don’t use social media.”

But that’s just not true.

Scientists & Social Media

Social media not only works in the B2B space but also in our science-based world. Our clients are talking to (and want to talk to) decision makers in pharma, healthcare, life science, and in the energy sector. They’re interacting with lab directors and managers, bench scientists, doctors, practice managers, I.T. administrators, C-level execs and others.

Scientists are just like the rest of the population.

They behave the same way we do when we’re searching for information. They all have smartphones, tablets and laptops, and they use them when they’re looking for the tools they need. They search the web for information – and they also search social media channels like LinkedIn, Twitter and Facebook.

That means they are looking at white papers, case studies, blog posts, conversations – all of which can be found online.

Social Media and Science-based Marketing

When I talk to potential customers about social media, I use this analogy because I think it helps science-based marketers understand how social media will fit in their marketing mix – and how it works.

Think about social media as a tree. You have the tree trunk, you have the branches and you have the leaves. For me, the tree trunk is the blog. That’s where all of your information resides – it’s your knowledge center. The branches are all of your social media channels (LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook, etc.) and the leaves are your customers who over time, through engagement with your brand, convert into leads.

The Blog Content Feedback Loop

Using analytics, you get ongoing feedback on the content you create. The more people who read certain posts and certain types of posts – whether it’s channel choice or content type – the more likely you will be to post that kind of material and continue the conversation.

Many brands want to push the conversations they are interested in promoting, rather than learning what the customer wants to know. But the analytics rarely lie, and the implications are clear: don’t post things people won’t read or share.

Here’s how that social media tree fits into your marketing mix.

Say you’ve created all of your marketing collateral about your product or service – your whitepapers, your case studies, your sales sheets, etc. You’ve done a press release about the new product or service, you’ve attended a trade show, set-up your e-marketing, and started doing digital and print advertising.

The key to making it all work is telling your story cohesively across all the marketing channels your customer is using to learn about your company. You need to provide information through your blog and social media that ties in all of your other content marketing elements, from white papers to press releases to awards to what you’re sending out on e-marketing as you’re generating leads. (Another bonus of a blog? Continually updating your website can improve your organic SEO!)

If you miss a marketing channel (on the ‘branches’ we talked about earlier) your customers are using to gather information, you risk ceasing to exist – and you won’t be part of the conversation when your buyer gets ready to make a decision about the product or service you offer.

All of this information needs to link back to your website. That’s where your customers are going to go before they even talk to you – especially scientists, since they always research their questions before they talk to a sales rep. It’s just their way.

Social Media Works

In the science and healthcare worlds, the sales process isn’t 24 hours.

We’re not selling a pen – we’re selling a $300,000 bit of kit or a $600,000 that’s an enterprise software platform. In some cases (outsourced drug manufacturing, for example) you may be selling a long-term relationship.

Sales cycles can run 6 – 18 months, and that means you need to nurture your leads.

If you’ve got that long of a sales cycle, you want to remind potential customers that you’re still there. You don’t need to talk to them every day (that’s not good), but you’ve got to stay in front of them and nurture them with useful information. It might let them do their job better, educate them, or provide them key information to make better business decisions. But you need to give them a reason to keep your company in their sights before they make a decision.

This is where your blog and social media excels – long-term lead nurturing and ongoing brand awareness.

For one major analytical equipment firm, a number of competitors had seized the online & social space and were driving the conversation in key markets. Several competitors had established blogs which were attracting hundreds of repeat visitors each month in search of relevant content. We implemented a social media program designed to (among other things):

  • Increase their visibility to analytical equipment decision makers in the life science industry
  • Establish thought leadership
  • Educate scientists and decision makers on new technologies
  • Increase reach in the life science industry.

We integrated the social media program with their overall marketing program. Via in-depth research, we identified the key content topics of particular interest to prospects.

In the first year, we increased their online reach to 100,000+ prospects each month, grew LinkedIn referrals to website from 0 to 300+ a month, increased social media referrals to the website 40-fold, and saw blog visitors expand to 1,000 per month.

The company established a dominant presence in the online space in fairly short order – all due to the use of targeted, well-researched content that appealed to readers. Scientists like information, so the use of the blog as a content anchor turned out to be a key success factor – giving the company the ability to expand the discussion beyond the short-form content common to social media.

The goal of marketing is to help drive sales.

It doesn’t mean you don’t need a sales force – you do. But marketing should partner and integrate with the sales team to increase brand awareness, identify & convert leads and grow revenue. Given the role social media plays in our lives today, it is a key tool in furthering these objectives – especially when your competitors are already there.

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Posted by on Oct 1, 2018 in Marketing Tips, Tradeshows, Uncategorized | 0 comments

Leveraging Digital Marketing for Lead Generation

One of the top questions clients ask us about digital marketing campaigns is how to turn leads into sales.

But what they really want is to understand how to knit together all of their marketing & digital tools and resources – the CRM, website, email marketing, social media accounts, PR, events, tradeshows and other marketing efforts – in order to maximize lead conversion. How do you make it all work?

Digital marketingalso referred to as eMarketing and online marketing – is typically campaign-driven. Effective e-campaign development includes clearly defining your target niche, your messaging, the content and its delivery.

Developing an e-campaign that nurtures a lead and initiates or continues the conversation with the prospect is part art and part science. Here are 4 Tips for an Effective Digital Marketing Campaign:

  1. Exhibiting at an Event? Get an Early Start

Brands spend a great deal of money exhibiting and attending shows, and efforts should focus on beginning the conversation long before the show or conference begins. Why? Because lead nurturing works best when it starts pre-show.

At many shows, exhibitors can purchase a list of registered attendees before the show. Too often, these are overlooked – or resources aren’t available to mine the lists. But they are a gold mine for digital campaigns.

Use the pre-show period to establish brand awareness and thought leadership. With eMarketing and automation platforms, these potential leads can be nurtured early, providing valuable data to the sales team tasked with touching these leads.

 

  1. Develop a Pipeline of Customer-Driven Content

Content makes the world – or, at least the internet – go round. The best sales content, of course, is something the prospect not only wants to read, but urgently needs to read. It grabs their attention and moves them further along the sales process.

The content chosen for an eMarketing campaign can vary widely. Its selection can depend on the channels being used (e.g., email marketing, print or digital advertising, social media) and the types of content favored by the target audience (e.g., video, case studies or white papers, newsletters, long-form).

The content pipeline should be as deep, rich and varied as possible. Too many campaigns fail when the have a limited amount of content to share or use the wrong type of content for the audience (e.g., a podcast instead of a video, or a newsletter instead of a case study).

 

  1. Feed & Track the Lead

Once upon a time, tracking a lead through the sales process – especially a B2B lead – was a hit or miss proposition. With CRMs such as Salesforce, Hubspot and others, those days are largely over. Marketing and sales teams can easily identify what people are clicking on and downloading, what they are reading, where they are spending their time, and how they are progressing through the sales funnel

With some client campaigns, we employ cloned landing pages or UTMs. These feature (or link to) the same content, but each boasts a unique web address used in a specific ad – print or digital – in order to track the effectiveness of ad buys, content, sources and more.

In digital advertising, social media and email marketing campaigns, it is important to make full use of tagged links (UTMs) to track where a lead arrived from, where they’re going, and what they’re doing.

 

  1. Analyze Results – and Act on Them

With today’s automation, not only will you be able to track the lead’s progress through your sales funnel, but you can also understand exactly what it is about your brand that has caught their interest – whether a brochure, case study, landing page, video testimonial or some other piece of content relevant to them.

More data lets you tweak the digital campaign to improve outcomes. And – just as important – it allows you to track ROI and determine the value of sales and marketing resources.

 

A well-thought-out digital marketing campaign coupled with a sales automation platform is one of the most effective tools for improving qualified B2B lead gen efforts.

Want to learn more about developing winning digital marketing campaigns? Contact Brandwidth Solutions today.

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